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Catholic Education Melbourne Wellbeing Project

During a recent Tuesday afternoon professional development session, Siena teachers who have been members of the Catholic Education Melbourne Wellbeing Project showcased the work they have been undertaking in their classes with our larger staff community. These staff members have been involved in embedding wellbeing practices in their academic classrooms to strengthen our students’ perception of teacher empathy and connectedness to community. 

The staff presented a range of strategies they have implemented, each from the Berry Street Education Model. These ranged from activities developed to improve students’ engagement in their learning by teaching our students to relate, communicate and work on challenging tasks without feeling uncertain, identify their signature strengths to develop ownership and connection to learning and establishing a capacity for our students to respond, rather than react through establishing explicit self regulation strategies. 

These resources were shared with staff who were then invited to trial a strategy in their own classroom with a view to embed the strategy into our ongoing practice as holistic educators who seek to develop the broadest definition of the whole student at both cognitive and affective levels, beyond the confines of the classroom. This whole school approach to embedding wellbeing practices into our learning and teaching culture at Siena College reiterates the intrinsic link that exists between academic outcomes and the wellbeing of our students. 

 

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During a recent Tuesday afternoon professional development session, Siena teachers who have been members of the Catholic Education Melbourne Wellbeing Project showcased the work they have been undertaking in their classes with our larger staff community. These staff members have been involved in embedding wellbeing practices in their academic classrooms to strengthen our students’ perception of teacher empathy and connectedness to community. 

The staff presented a range of strategies they have implemented, each from the Berry Street Education Model. These ranged from activities developed to improve students’ engagement in their learning by teaching our students to relate, communicate and work on challenging tasks without feeling uncertain, identify their signature strengths to develop ownership and connection to learning and establishing a capacity for our students to respond, rather than react through establishing explicit self regulation strategies. 

These resources were shared with staff who were then invited to trial a strategy in their own classroom with a view to embed the strategy into our ongoing practice as holistic educators who seek to develop the broadest definition of the whole student at both cognitive and affective levels, beyond the confines of the classroom. This whole school approach to embedding wellbeing practices into our learning and teaching culture at Siena College reiterates the intrinsic link that exists between academic outcomes and the wellbeing of our students.