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Wellbeing

Big Sister, Little Sister PJ Party

Coloured pyjamas, comfy slippers and broad smiles epitomised this year’s gathering.  Year 12 Big Sisters welcomed their Year 7 Little Sisters into the College Gymnasium for a fun night of dancing, singing and general frivolity.  This long-standing tradition is another highlight of the Transition Program for students at Siena College and one that both year levels will remember fondly. 

This month on SchoolTV - Grief & Loss

Grief is a natural response to loss. It might be the loss of a loved one, relationship or even a pet. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief is likely to be. Children and adults grieve differently due to their developmental stage, and this can prove difficult for parents to understand. 

Young children fluctuate in and out of the stages of grief rapidly, as they may not comprehend the permanency of death. They express their grief more physically. Teens on the other hand may not know how to express their grief and will need some space to process their loss. Some may choose to grieve alone, not wanting to stand out or be seen as not coping. 

In this edition of SchoolTV, parents can learn how to acknowledge their child’s feelings and the best way to support them through the grief.

If you have any concerns about your child, please contact the school counsellor for further information

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Big Sister, Little Sister PJ Party

Coloured pyjamas, comfy slippers and broad smiles epitomised this year’s gathering.  Year 12 Big Sisters welcomed their Year 7 Little Sisters into the College Gymnasium for a fun night of dancing, singing and general frivolity.  This long-standing tradition is another highlight of the Transition Program for students at Siena College and one that both year levels will remember fondly. 

This month on SchoolTV - Grief & Loss

Grief is a natural response to loss. It might be the loss of a loved one, relationship or even a pet. The more significant the loss, the more intense the grief is likely to be. Children and adults grieve differently due to their developmental stage, and this can prove difficult for parents to understand. 

Young children fluctuate in and out of the stages of grief rapidly, as they may not comprehend the permanency of death. They express their grief more physically. Teens on the other hand may not know how to express their grief and will need some space to process their loss. Some may choose to grieve alone, not wanting to stand out or be seen as not coping. 

In this edition of SchoolTV, parents can learn how to acknowledge their child’s feelings and the best way to support them through the grief.

If you have any concerns about your child, please contact the school counsellor for further information