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The Value of Service

'You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.' 
John Bunyan

Each fortnight a group of Siena student and teacher volunteers meet at the St Dominic’s Parish office before school on a Tuesday to prepare food for the St Vincent de Paul Society food services.  Loaves of bread, sweet buns and treats are donated by a local bakery and we work for almost an hour making sandwiches and packaging sweets.  The students never see the people enjoy the food they are preparing, but it is understood that the work that we are doing is purposeful and important, and it means that someone will have something to eat that evening who may have otherwise gone without.  There is great comradery in the kitchen as the food is prepared and we all return to school feeling energised and in good spirits from the service we have been able to provide. 

At the end of Term 3, it was a great privilege to be involved in the St Dominic’s Parish Seniors Luncheon.  As the Parishioners gathered for their lunch, eight Siena students enjoyed the opportunity to serve them a meal, drinks and dessert prepared by other Parish members.  Beyond serving, our students appreciated the opportunity to spend time in conversation with the Seniors, many of whom have had connections with Siena in years past.  

Social researcher Hugh Mackay has investigated the individual and societal value that comes from connecting with others within our neighbourhood, our Parish and our broader community. He says 'if we lose our capacity for unconditional compassion, if we lose sight of our true nature as members of a society – and if we focus too much on our own wants, our own entitlements and our own gratifications, with little regard for the needs and wellbeing of others, there will be an inevitable threat to our mental health.'.  Mackay’s work goes on to suggest that we all benefit from people adopting more compassionate and pro social behaviours and attitudes.  Additionally, through our service to, and involvement in our community, we have great power to change the character and values of our society.  'We can have a powerful influence on the state of the various communities we belong to – in the neighbourhood, the workplace, the university, the church or other faith community, the sporting association, the book club or other community organisation. How we contribute to the miniatures of life – in our own family, street, suburb or town – will ultimately help to determine the big picture'.  All Siena students are encouraged to be of service the community.

To read more of Hugh Mackay’s research and findings click here

 

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'You have not lived today until you have done something for someone who can never repay you.' 
John Bunyan

Each fortnight a group of Siena student and teacher volunteers meet at the St Dominic’s Parish office before school on a Tuesday to prepare food for the St Vincent de Paul Society food services.  Loaves of bread, sweet buns and treats are donated by a local bakery and we work for almost an hour making sandwiches and packaging sweets.  The students never see the people enjoy the food they are preparing, but it is understood that the work that we are doing is purposeful and important, and it means that someone will have something to eat that evening who may have otherwise gone without.  There is great comradery in the kitchen as the food is prepared and we all return to school feeling energised and in good spirits from the service we have been able to provide. 

At the end of Term 3, it was a great privilege to be involved in the St Dominic’s Parish Seniors Luncheon.  As the Parishioners gathered for their lunch, eight Siena students enjoyed the opportunity to serve them a meal, drinks and dessert prepared by other Parish members.  Beyond serving, our students appreciated the opportunity to spend time in conversation with the Seniors, many of whom have had connections with Siena in years past.  

Social researcher Hugh Mackay has investigated the individual and societal value that comes from connecting with others within our neighbourhood, our Parish and our broader community. He says 'if we lose our capacity for unconditional compassion, if we lose sight of our true nature as members of a society – and if we focus too much on our own wants, our own entitlements and our own gratifications, with little regard for the needs and wellbeing of others, there will be an inevitable threat to our mental health.'.  Mackay’s work goes on to suggest that we all benefit from people adopting more compassionate and pro social behaviours and attitudes.  Additionally, through our service to, and involvement in our community, we have great power to change the character and values of our society.  'We can have a powerful influence on the state of the various communities we belong to – in the neighbourhood, the workplace, the university, the church or other faith community, the sporting association, the book club or other community organisation. How we contribute to the miniatures of life – in our own family, street, suburb or town – will ultimately help to determine the big picture'.  All Siena students are encouraged to be of service the community.

To read more of Hugh Mackay’s research and findings click here