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Respectful Relationships – Changing the Story for Our Young People

Siena College students from Year 10 have been working with a network of schools to develop programs for students and parents around Respectful Relationships.  Harmonious Families – Changing the Story For Our Young People, is the title of the parent seminar that was held on Wednesday, 23 October.  This conversation was led by students across our network of schools that assists in building understanding, knowledge and action about creating harmonious families. It was followed by an opportunity to discuss how we can work together to create respectful relationships in our community by exploring our understanding of stereotypes, expectations and roles.

Siena College is part of a bigger network of schools and services, a Community of Practice, that is committed to building respectful relationships in our community and in our schools.

These shared conversations have allowed students to better understand one another and as a result begin to consider what we can all be doing on a day to day basis to work on building respectful relationships in all aspects of our lives.  Students from Avila College, Sacred Heart Girls College, Mazenod College and Salesian College facilitated the parent conversations on Wednesday evening. 

Dr Helen Keleher from Monash University presented some of the key factors impacting families and young people in our community. Dr Keleher is Adjunct Professor at Monash University and now works as a consultant. She works with a wide range of organisations on gender equity which has been a passion of hers for over thirty years.  Dr Keleher has decades of research experience and is widely acknowledged for her skills in health promotion, women’s health and the prevention of violence against women. She has also authored several books.  We know that there is a great deal of evidence-based research in this area, which informs our educational approach and what we can do as a community to generate a greater understanding of the impact violence against women.

By understanding this landscape and actively engaging in open communication, we can help build the capacity in our young people ‘to change the story’ for our future and future generations.

 

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Siena College students from Year 10 have been working with a network of schools to develop programs for students and parents around Respectful Relationships.  Harmonious Families – Changing the Story For Our Young People, is the title of the parent seminar that was held on Wednesday, 23 October.  This conversation was led by students across our network of schools that assists in building understanding, knowledge and action about creating harmonious families. It was followed by an opportunity to discuss how we can work together to create respectful relationships in our community by exploring our understanding of stereotypes, expectations and roles.

Siena College is part of a bigger network of schools and services, a Community of Practice, that is committed to building respectful relationships in our community and in our schools.

These shared conversations have allowed students to better understand one another and as a result begin to consider what we can all be doing on a day to day basis to work on building respectful relationships in all aspects of our lives.  Students from Avila College, Sacred Heart Girls College, Mazenod College and Salesian College facilitated the parent conversations on Wednesday evening. 

Dr Helen Keleher from Monash University presented some of the key factors impacting families and young people in our community. Dr Keleher is Adjunct Professor at Monash University and now works as a consultant. She works with a wide range of organisations on gender equity which has been a passion of hers for over thirty years.  Dr Keleher has decades of research experience and is widely acknowledged for her skills in health promotion, women’s health and the prevention of violence against women. She has also authored several books.  We know that there is a great deal of evidence-based research in this area, which informs our educational approach and what we can do as a community to generate a greater understanding of the impact violence against women.

By understanding this landscape and actively engaging in open communication, we can help build the capacity in our young people ‘to change the story’ for our future and future generations.