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Year 9 Geography Field Trip to Toolangi Forest

Student Reflection:

On Wednesday, 4 September, I travelled to Toolangi Forest with my Geography class to learn about the range of precious biomes in Victoria’s forests.  

We learnt all about the soil conditions in Toolangi, which is rich, deep, moist and therefore very productive. The Toolangi Forest has productivity because there are lots of resources, animals and plants compared to a desert which has poor/dry soil and no plants. The rainfall is very high with 1600mm per year approximately and there are about sixty to seventy plants which have all adapted to fire. The Mountain Ash Tree I saw was fascinating because it was over 300 years old.  The Toolangi forest hasn’t had a major  bushfire since the Black Friday fire in 1939, which means that there haven't been regular cycles of burning to regenerate. As a result, there is a huge fuel load of undergrowth in the forest.

We visited the Sylvia Creek and were able to safely drink the water because it was fresh, clean and there were no chemicals. Caroline was our tour guide and talked about the Taungurrong people who lived in the Toolangi forest and considered the rainforest a spiritual place. I learnt that Thompson’s Dam (which is fed by the Yarra River) and Maroondah Reservoir supply the majority of Melbourne's water supply. Pollution with rubbish, petrol and fertiliser are some of the ways people are currently affecting the water quality and quantity of water supplies.  It was a great experience that I would recommend for the Year 8s next year! 
Alana Totora 

Student Reflection

On Wednesday, 4 September, my class travelled to the Toolangi forests to further our understanding of the forest biomes. Once arriving at the first forest we would be visiting we ensured that our legs were covered to protect us from leeches.  Our guide for the day was Caroline who was very informative. At the Mountain Ash forest, we saw a three hundred year old tree which had miraculously survived after a fire burnt the majority of the forest. We learnt that the soil was volcanic, rich and deep. The climate has a high rainfall and creates a temperate forest. The tree was called the Mountain Ash tree as it has adapted to fire. The next forest we went to was the Toolangi Discovery Centre, it was really nice because we were able to drink from the Sylvia Creek. The two catchments that receive water that has fallen as rain in the Toolangi state forest are the Goulburn Broken catchment and the Yarra River catchment. 

The majority of Melbourne’s water supply comes from Thompson Dam and the Maroondah Reservoir. The Aboriginal tribe who called the forest home are called the Taungurrung tribe, who considered the forest as spiritual and a part of them. They sometimes burn parts of the forest for the hunting of animals.  The final forest we went to was called the Rusty Forest which was a timber harvesting place. We saw many stumps of trees which were recently cut down for the use of timber but some were left standing which indicated that they were needed for the habitat for animals. The overall experience was very enjoyable.
Katia Di Donato 

 

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Student Reflection:

On Wednesday, 4 September, I travelled to Toolangi Forest with my Geography class to learn about the range of precious biomes in Victoria’s forests.  

We learnt all about the soil conditions in Toolangi, which is rich, deep, moist and therefore very productive. The Toolangi Forest has productivity because there are lots of resources, animals and plants compared to a desert which has poor/dry soil and no plants. The rainfall is very high with 1600mm per year approximately and there are about sixty to seventy plants which have all adapted to fire. The Mountain Ash Tree I saw was fascinating because it was over 300 years old.  The Toolangi forest hasn’t had a major  bushfire since the Black Friday fire in 1939, which means that there haven't been regular cycles of burning to regenerate. As a result, there is a huge fuel load of undergrowth in the forest.

We visited the Sylvia Creek and were able to safely drink the water because it was fresh, clean and there were no chemicals. Caroline was our tour guide and talked about the Taungurrong people who lived in the Toolangi forest and considered the rainforest a spiritual place. I learnt that Thompson’s Dam (which is fed by the Yarra River) and Maroondah Reservoir supply the majority of Melbourne's water supply. Pollution with rubbish, petrol and fertiliser are some of the ways people are currently affecting the water quality and quantity of water supplies.  It was a great experience that I would recommend for the Year 8s next year! 
Alana Totora 

Student Reflection

On Wednesday, 4 September, my class travelled to the Toolangi forests to further our understanding of the forest biomes. Once arriving at the first forest we would be visiting we ensured that our legs were covered to protect us from leeches.  Our guide for the day was Caroline who was very informative. At the Mountain Ash forest, we saw a three hundred year old tree which had miraculously survived after a fire burnt the majority of the forest. We learnt that the soil was volcanic, rich and deep. The climate has a high rainfall and creates a temperate forest. The tree was called the Mountain Ash tree as it has adapted to fire. The next forest we went to was the Toolangi Discovery Centre, it was really nice because we were able to drink from the Sylvia Creek. The two catchments that receive water that has fallen as rain in the Toolangi state forest are the Goulburn Broken catchment and the Yarra River catchment. 

The majority of Melbourne’s water supply comes from Thompson Dam and the Maroondah Reservoir. The Aboriginal tribe who called the forest home are called the Taungurrung tribe, who considered the forest as spiritual and a part of them. They sometimes burn parts of the forest for the hunting of animals.  The final forest we went to was called the Rusty Forest which was a timber harvesting place. We saw many stumps of trees which were recently cut down for the use of timber but some were left standing which indicated that they were needed for the habitat for animals. The overall experience was very enjoyable.
Katia Di Donato